Mysterious discovery inside red coffin engraved with phoenix bird found in Inner Mongolia

Mysterious discovery inside red coffin engraved with phoenix bird found in Inner Mongolia

Opening the red coffin, archaeologists discovered the body of a woman who showed no signs of decomposition, wearing up to 11 layers of clothing, buried with precious jewels made of gold.

Chinese archaeologists have unearthed a coffin.

In 2003, at Mount Turki, in the city of Thong Lieu, Inner Mongolia, China, while mining, workers here accidentally blew up an ancient tomb and discovered inside a mysterious coffin that was as red as blood. They immediately briefed the experts on the situation and received a warning: Don’t go near it.

Shortly thereafter, the staff of the Museum of Thong Lieu city and some officials of the city Police Department went to the scene to survey. The exterior of the tomb is built quite rudimentary despite its large size. Experts assessed preliminarily, the age of the tomb must be up to thousands of years old, i.e. belonging to the Jie dan period or also known as the Liao Dynasty.

After more than two months, the ancient tomb area was opened, the team found a strange bright red coffin and hundreds of objects buried in the ground for thousands of years.

The burial items include a lot of silver, bronze items commonly used in ancient life, in addition to paintings, carpentry, glassware, equestrian tools and silk fabrics. On the metal objects are also engraved with extremely delicate visual motifs, proving that the identity of the body in the ancient tomb must come from nobles.

According to experts, the fact that the coffin is painted red is extremely rare, even unprecedented in China. Red symbolizes good things, from ancient times used only by the Chinese in weddings, envelopes or events to welcome the New Year. Anyone who wears clothes or uses red objects at a funeral is considered inappropriate.

Besides, the coffin is not only painted red. It is also engraved with many different motifs, including the image of the phoenix.

The phoenix-shaped motif is engraved outside the coffin.

Opening the red coffin, archaeologists discovered the body of a woman who showed no signs of decomposition, wearing up to 11 layers of clothing, buried with precious jewels made of gold.

It is not uncommon for the dead to wear layers of clothing in Chinese history, but it is unprecedented to wear up to 11 layers of clothing.

Archaeologists were even more surprised when they discovered the last layer of clothing, discovering a black body of water around. The autopsy results showed that this was mercury, which could play a role in preventing the body from decomposing.

Eventually, they decided to transfer the body to the museum for cleaning and dna testing. The results of the DNA test report surprised scholars.

After combining with DNA taken from the tombs of King Liaoning Thai To, it was shown that there was a compatible relationship that confirmed the identity of the owner of the tomb was actually Princess Lu Lu She, the king’s sister.

According to the history books, the princess once colluded with her husband to join the rebellion to overthrow the court now but failed. The princess was not convicted of death but was also imprisoned in a dungeon. In the end, the princess died of illness.

Liao Thai To couldn’t kill her, ordering her sister to be locked up in prison. When she died of her illness, the princess was buried only in a normal manner, but was still buried with valuable artifacts.

The Liao Dynasty existed for 210 years, from 907 to 1125, taking its capital in what is now Inner Mongolia, which was later annexed by the Kim people.

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